Archive for the “Zoom zoom zoom” Category

Oakland a la chance d’avoir une belle scène autocollante, indépendante de San Francisco et riche d’artistes très variés. Pour commencer l’année 2011 en beauté, voici une liste de ceux qui auront toute mon attention au cours des prochains mois. Pour certains d’entre eux, j’attends même avec curiosité de voir leur évolution. Les californiens ont tendance a se contenter du noir et blanc, je suis plus adepte des couleurs. Pourvu qu’ils s’y mettent.

Pour avoir un bon aperçu de ce qui se passe dans la Baie de San Francisco, voici une quelques Flickr qui en donnent un joli panorama.

Endless canvas
Baby cujo
Bay area stickers
Bay area graffiti

The Bay Area of San Francisco is full of street artists. Oakland has its own talents. There are various sticker artists that I particularly like. To start 2011 with positive vibrations, here is a list of a few artists that I am curious to see evolve in the next months. Californians seem to enjoy black and white stickers. I tend to prefer colors. Of course, a lot of artists are missing, so don’t hesitate to send me pictures or link. I am always happy to see more creative stuff!

Also, I don’t take that many photos, but some guys in the area are doing a great job at it. You can start with these Flickr, they would give you a good idea of what is going on.

Endless canvas
Baby cujo
Bay area stickers
Bay area graffiti

Donc je commence, sans ordre particulier:
With no particular order:

PIKA

BROKE

More on Flickr

BEER IS GOOD

I can just agree.

More on Flickr

DEADEYES

More on Flickr

OASIS

He is new, he is cool, he became visible really fast. I love his faces/masks.

RAS TERMS

Je me permet de lui emprunter cette photo, étant donné que je n’en ai aucune de récente. Quoi qu’il en soit, il a un véritable style, son propre langage, une identité très marquée et je suis assez fan de son originalité.

I feel a shame, I don’t have any recent picture of his work. I took this one from his photo-stream, I hope he won’t mind. Anyway, keep an eye on his stuff, that’s just great. He has a real universe, his own aesthetic, his own language, that’s totally original.

More on Flickr

G

I don’t know why he is called creeptopus on Flickr, given that he never signed anything else than G. That’s quite funny. The octopus is super fun. I love logos and this one works perfectly.

More on Flickr

SWAMPY

If you have some of his sticker to trade, just tell me. I’ve been trying to get some of his stuff for a while.

More on Flickr

BS

The only thing I know is that he appeared one day and was all over the place. I love the special Halloween bomb.

PKR

I saw that last week. I am already a big fan.

SAFETY FIRST

RANDOM

This is the real purpose of this post, to make a tribute to all these anonymous artists whom I see the work all around without really knowing who they are. My favorite thing is to find new stickers, new images, new logos, with no real artistic meanings but with a fascinating results.

This post is not meant to be a best-of, this is a sample of what I see around. I would love if you have links are names to share about artists of the Bay Area.

Comments 1 Comment »

[J’ai mis la traduction en français a la suite. Néanmoins je recommande aux bilingues la VO, plus authentique.]

adam01

After DAVe Warnke, here is a second interview. I am still focusing on stickers and posters. I hope I would find time to interview more people in the future. First time I saw Adam Infanticide art was in Berkeley, a sticker saying “will you be my friend” without any signature. Then Eko told me the name of this artist. I became a big fan of his work. Some years later I fell really happy he accepted to answer this interview. Thanks to him. I hope you will enjoy it.

Interview of  Adam Infanticide / Questions by Koleo

Can you introduce yourself? What is your nickname? If you are in a crew, which one?

I’m Adam Infanticide. I’m involved with the Mishap Collective.

This is a powerful name. What does it mean for you? Are you religious?

There actually isn’t any interesting story behind it. I’m not religious. I’m generally pretty anti-religion. I just wanted a “nom de plume” that probably hadn’t been used before that was provocative and kind of obnoxious like a punk rock name, like Johnny Rotten or whatever. Actually, a few years ago, I was having some mental issues and I actually thought it would be a good idea to have my name legally changed to Adam Infanticide. Luckily I was too lazy and incompetent to really go through with it.

I find this name really strong, although I have never seen it in the street. Was that a conscious decision or just a question of space on your sticker?

I’m pretty sure the messages came before the name but mainly it was important to me that the messages be anonymous. “Signing” the stickers, I felt, would detract from their messages. I like the idea that the random person reading the sticker can imagine that the message is specially addressed to him or her.

adam06

Instead of your nickname I saw that you signed with a little heart. Why such a contrast between the strength of the name and the sweetness of this logo?

I want the audience to feel that the sticker is friendly, that it means them well, even if the words are disturbing or whatever. It does become sort of signature, even though a lot of street art uses heart iconography. Actually not all of my messages get hearts, just most of them. There are a few where I don’t think it would work; it would contradict the words too much.

Your work is essentially text, not like taggers who graphically play with the letters. Your stickers have short sentences, full of meaning, almost mottos. How do they come to you? What is your writing process?

The quote-unquote “art” is less the stickers or the words themselves but in the reaction of the reader, what it makes them think. I want them to accessible and aesthetically generic, unadorned by any fancy stylistic flourishes. But since they’re hand-written there are a lot of organic imperfections to the lettering. The phrases themselves are just reactions to things I see and whatnot.

Do you keep them in a notebook?

I used to but now I just try and remember them.

Do you reuse them sometimes?

I reuse phrases all the time since the stickers are basically temporary in nature. A lot of them are sort of topical so if I decide one of my little slogans has become irrelevant, it gets retired, at least temporarily.

To make my question more precise, I would like to know if you have a ritual, if you follow certain rules.

There is definitely an obsessive/ compulsive aspect to making these fucking things. Making them has a meditative quality to me but I have to watch out or I’ll waste too much of my time on it. When it comes to putting them up, I’m fairly particular as to where they go. Like certain messages might have more relevance in one specific part of town but not another. A lot of them lose meaning outside of the US. Of course, when other people are putting up one of my stickers, I lose that control.

Sometimes I feel claustrophobic in the USA. The conformism and the superficial morality are heavy. Your messages leave a strong imprint in my mind; I read them as a breath of fresh air. How would you describe your style?

Well, we’re constantly bombarded by advertising and corporate propaganda whenever we leave our homes but there’s no forum for regular people to express themselves publicly. How can there be free speech if you have to rent a billboard or own a TV station or newspaper to say something? You can’t compete with mass media. There are barely any public spaces for people to go unless you’re going to buy something. Street art is a small but significant reaction to that.

adam03

Do you think you are insolent or anti conformist?

Probably both.

What do you think about t-shirts with messages?

A friend of mine (Damian Kalish) was doing that. Every day for like five years he’d write a message on a shirt with a sharpie and then wear that. Some of them dealt with, let’s say, uncomfortable political issues that really antagonized people especially when he wasn’t in our little metropolitan safe haven for progressives. I’m amazed he never got his ass beat by rednecks. We’ve actually had a few of my stickers printed on shirts but most of them work better as an anonymous message that you randomly come across on the street. By wearing a message, you are directly associating yourself with it and showing implicit approval for what it says.

Are there other street artists that you like? Do you have some names to drop?

There are tons of hella good street artists around here. Mildred is one of my current favorites. I’d suggest everybody visit the Triple 2 Seven Gallery on International in Oakland.

What do you think of stickers in the Bay Area? How would you describe the scene, what makes it different than other places?

It’s a pretty vibrant scene with a lot of unique work. There’s a pretty rich history of more “traditional” graffiti, the artsy-fartsy type shit that I do and everything in between. Unfortunately, in San Francisco, they spend more than anywhere on persecuting street art artists and buffing artwork despite a large portion of the community’s tolerance of street art. The graffiti abatement people are fanatical about maintaining control of the environment, which is what it’s all about, not eliminating so-called “urban blight”. Girafa recently got caught. Why are we wasting so much of our resources on this when there’s no money for schools? I find it insane that someone could be bothered by something put on a cement wall, but wouldn’t even notice an ugly wall that was “clean”. It has nothing to do with aesthetics and everything to do with a perceived encroachment upon social order.

adam05

The sentences might be short; I still see them as a writing work. How does literature influence you?

I’m fairly well read. Even though they are just simple text, I view my work more as conceptual art than writing. They’re intrusive little interruptions to your daily life like outdoor advertising that will hopefully make the reader react somehow. I think I was originally influenced by people like Barbara Kruger and her provocative text-based art.

Are there other forms of art which feed your creativity?

I’m into a pretty wide variety of art. I usually like to participate in whatever project my friends are working on if I can. I’d rather have a lot of different things to play around with than to concentrate just on one art form.

Since how long have you been sticking? How did you evolve?

I’ve been doing this for years, since I was a kid. It’s really kind of pathetic. And it might sound weird, but my earliest messages were inspired by Yoko Ono and the “instruction pieces” she was doing with the Fluxus people. These were just text, just these absurd, often impossible, suggestions like “paint with your blood until you pass out or die”. Her book, Grapefruit is a collection of them. Basically, I stole that idea and it eventually evolved into less commands and more mundane little declarations and observations.

Also, I used to collect these bizarre photocopied fliers this insane guy in my town used to do. They were these anonymous, incoherent rants addressed to the community at large that more or less said stuff like, “repent your sins, you’re going to hell, et cetera”. They were long, meandering screeds that eventually got more and more pissed off and illegible. Some of my friends and I decided to get some stickers and fill them up with fucked-up stories so you’d be walking down the street and you’d come across this thing with a bunch of tiny writing on it.

Nowadays you can really see your impact on the internet; finding pictures of your stuff and people’s reactions. Do you feel like being a part of the popular culture?

It’s always cool to get a larger audience for your art but I don’t think seeing somebody’s photo documentation is really the same as encountering the words themselves on the street.

Do you see yourself still doing it in 5 or 10 years?

I don’t really know. Probably.

Do you make art on other mediums?

The stickers have never been my main thing. I don’t go out to specifically put them up. I just bring some when I go out. I’m not that prolific. I do some painting, occasionally some music. My art collective put on a few art and music shows a year, the Mishap prom and things like that. I try to be productive. Now I’ve got a job teaching art to little kids, which is pretty crazy.

Do you have one or two good stories to share? People’s reaction towards one of you sticker?

People will sometimes write responses. Or even do sticker responses. Someone wrote that a sticker was asinine and vulgar. At least it made them feel something. Once a girl (I’m assuming) wrote her phone number and a little note that said to call her or something. I didn’t, though. Sorry!

Something else to say? A message or people you want to speak about?

I think that’s about it.

Links

Crapcore

Mishap

Gallery 1

Gallery 2

adam10

adam09

adam11

Après DAVe Warnke voici un deuxième interview. J’espère trouver le temps d’en faire plus. Je me focalise toujours sur les autocollants et les affiches. La première fois que j’ai vu un autocollant d’Adam Infanticide c’était à Berkeley, un “veux tu être mon ami” (will you be my friend) sans signature. Puis Eko m’a donné son nom, j’ai continué à regarder ces petits textes avec beaucoup d’attention. Quelques années plus tard me voici content qu’il ait accepté de répondre à cet interview. Merci à lui. Bonne lecture.

Questions de Koleo, réponses d’Adam Infanticide

Peux tu te présenter? Ton surnom, ton crew.

Je suis Adam Infanticide. Je fais partie de Mishap Collective.

C’est un nom lourd à porter. Que signifie-t-il pour toi ? D’ailleurs, es-tu religieux ?

À vrai dire il n’y a aucune histoire particulière derrière ce nom. Je ne suis pas religieux. Je suis plutôt anti-religion. Je voulais juste un “nom de plume” jamais utilisé auparavant qui soit provoquant et odieux, comme dans le punk avec des noms à la Johnny Rotten. En fait, il y a quelques années, j’avais quelques problèmes mentaux et je pensais que ça serait une bonne idée de changer mon nom officiellement pour Adam Infanticide. Heureusement j’ai été trop paresseux et incompétent pour le faire.

Je trouve ce nom très fort bien que je ne l’ai jamais lu dans la rue. Était-ce une décision consciente ou une question de place sur l’autocollant?

Je suis à peu prêt sur que les messages existaient avant le nom, mais ce qui m’importait c’était que les messages soient anonymes. « Signer » les autocollants, à mon sens, atténuerait leurs messages. J’aime l’idée que le passant qui lit l’autocollant puisse penser que le message lui est spécialement adressé.

adam07


En revanche, au lieu d’un nom j’ai souvent vu un petit cœur en signature. Pourquoi un tel contraste entre la force de ton surnom et la douceur de ce logo?

Je veux que l’autocollant soit vu amicalement par son public, que l’on comprenne que ses intentions sont bonnes, même si les mots sont déroutants ou je ne sais quoi. Ça devient en quelque sorte ma signature, même si l’on retrouve souvent l’image du cœur dans l’art de rue. À vrai dire mes messages ne sont pas tous signés d’un cœur, seulement la plupart d’entre eux. Il y en a quelques uns pour lesquels je pense que ça ne marcherais pas, la contradiction avec le texte serais trop forte.

Ton travail est essentiellement centré autour du texte, pas comme un tagger qui va s’amuser à déformer les lettres. Tu écris sur tes autocollants des petites phrases pleines de sens qui se rapprochent du slogan. Comment te viennent-elles ? Quel est ton processus créatif ?

L’ « art » entre guillemets est moins dans l’autocollant que dans la réaction du lecteur, ce qu’ils en pensent. Je veux mes autocollants accessibles et esthétiquement quelconques, dépouillés de tout style. Mais puisqu’ils sont fait-main ils ont intrinsèquement plein d’imperfections dans le lettrage. Les phrases en elles-mêmes sont justes des réactions à ce que je vois.

Est-ce que tu les conserves dans un cahier?

Avant oui, mais maintenant j’essaie simplement de m’en souvenir.

T’arrives-t-il de réutiliser tes phrases?

Tout le temps puisque les autocollants sont temporaires par nature. Beaucoup sont en lien avec l’actualité donc si je trouve qu’un de mes petits slogans devient hors de propos il prend sa retraite, au moins temporairement.

Pour préciser ma question j’aimerais savoir si tu as un rituel, si tu t’impose certaines règles.

Il y a définitivement un aspect obsessif/compulsif à faire ces putains de trucs. Il y a aussi un caractère méditatif auquel je fais attention pour ne pas y perdre tout mon temps. Au moment de les coller je porte une attention toute particulière au lieu. Certains messages peuvent être pertinents dans un quartier de la ville et pas dans un autre. La plupart perde leur sens hors des États-Unis. Bien sur, si quelqu’un d’autre colle mon autocollant je perds ce contrôle.

Parfois vivre aux États-Unis me rend claustrophobe. Le conformisme et la morale superficielle sont lourds. Tes messages ont marqués mon esprit ; je les prends comme un souffle frais qui me fait respirer. Comment décrirais-tu ton style ?

Nous sommes constamment bombardés par la publicité et la propagande institutionnelle à chaque fois que nous mettons le nez dehors mais il n’y a pas de forum où les gens ordinaires peuvent s’exprimer publiquement. Comment peut-il y avoir une liberté d’expression s’il faut louer un panneau publicitaire ou posséder une chaine de télévision ou un journal pour pouvoir dire quelque chose ? Tu ne peux pas faire concurrence aux medias de masse. Il n’y a pratiquement aucun espace public où aller à moins d’acheter quelque chose. L’art de rue est une petite mais pas moins significative réaction à cela.

adam04

Te trouves-tu insolent ou anticonformiste?

Probablement les deux.

Tu penses quoi des t-shirt à messages ?

Un ami à moi (Damian Kalish) en faisait. Chaque jour pendant environ 5 ans il écrivait un message sur un t-shirt au marqueur et puis il le portait. Certains avait avoir avec, comment dire, des sujets politiques qui pouvaient mettre les gens mal à l’aise surtout quand il sortait de notre petit refuge métropolitain pour progressistes. Je suis stupéfait qu’il ne se soit jamais fait casser la gueule par des rednecks (cul-terreux).

On avait fait imprimer quelques uns de mes autocollants sur t-shirt mais la plupart fonctionnent mieux en message anonyme que tu croise par hasard dans la rue. En portant un message tu t’associe directement avec en montrant implicitement ton approbation.

Est-ce qu’il y a d’autres artistes que tu apprécies ? As-tu des noms à donner ?

Il y a des tonnes de putain de bons artistes de rue dans le coin. Mildred est un de mes préférés. Je suggèrerais à tout le monde d’aller visiter la Triple 2 Seven Gallery sur International Boulevard à Oakland.

Tu penses quoi des autocollants de la baie de San Francisco? En quels termes décrirais-tu la scène locale, qu’est ce qui la rend unique ?

C’est une scène assez vibrante avec beaucoup d’originalité. Il y a une histoire assez riche au niveau de graffiti « traditionnel », des machins soit disant artistiques que je fais et de tout ce qui se trouve entre. Malheureusement à San Francisco, ils dépensent plus que nulle part ailleurs pour poursuivre les artistes de rue et pour nettoyer les œuvres de rue malgré une large tolérance du public pour l’art de rue. Ceux qui s’attèlent à réduire la présence des graffitis sont des fanatiques du contrôle de leur environnement, et ce n’est que de ça dont il s’agit, et non pas de nettoyer les mauvaises herbes urbaines. Girafa s’est fait attraper récemment. Pourquoi gâcher nos ressources là dedans alors qu’il n’y a plus d’argent pour les écoles ? Je trouve ça malsain que quelqu’un puisse être déranger par ce que quelqu’un d’autre peut mettre sur un mur de ciment, sans même remarquer la laideur d’un mur « propre ». Ça n’a rien à voir avec l’esthétique, mais avec la perception que ces gens ont de l’empiétement sur l’ordre social.

adam08


Les phrases ont beau être courtes; je les considère quand même comme un travail d’écriture. De quelle manière as-tu été influencé par la littérature ?

Je suis plutôt bien lu. Bien que ce soit des textes simples, je vois mon travail plus comme de l’art conceptuel que comme de l’écriture. Ces textes sont des petites interruptions intrusives au quotidien comme de la publicité qui, je l’espère, créé une réaction chez le lecteur. Je crois que j’ai été influencé par des gens comme Barbara Kruger et son art fait de textes provocants.

Es tu inspiré par d’autres formes d’art?

Je m’intéresse à toute une variété de supports artistiques. En général, si je peux, je participe aux projets sur lesquels mes amis travaillent, quel qu’ils soient. Je préfère jouer avec tout un tas de choses plutôt que de me concentrer sur une seule forme d’art.

Depuis combien de temps colles-tu ? Comment as-tu évolué ?

Je fais ça depuis des années, depuis que je suis gamin. C’est vraiment pathétique d’ailleurs. Et ça peut paraitre bizarre mais mes premiers messages étaient inspirés par Yoko Ono et les « instruction pieces » qu’elle faisait avec les gens de Fluxus. Il s’agissait de textes, des suggestions absurdes, souvent impossible, comme « peins avec ton sang jusqu’à ce que tu t’évanouisses ou que tu meurs ». Son livre Grapefruit est une collection de ces suggestions. Au fond, j’ai volé cette idée et ça a fini par évoluer en quelque chose qui avait moins d’instructions et plus de déclarations et d’observations banales.

J’avais pour habitude de collectionner ces étranges prospectus qu’un mec dément de ma ville faisait. C’était des divagations incohérentes et anonymes adressées à la communauté, des trucs plus ou moins comme « repend tes péchés, tu vas aller en enfer, etc. ». Les messages étaient longs, des laïus qui s’égaraient dans des méandres en devenant de plus en plus énervés et illisible. Avec des potes j’avais décidé de faire des autocollants et des les remplir d’histoires complètement dingues, donc tu pouvais passer dans la rue et tomber sur ces trucs rempli de minuscules écritures.

De nos jours on peut facilement voir son impact sur internet, en retrouvant ses œuvres et les réactions des gens. Te sens tu faire partie de la culture populaire ?

C’es toujours cool d’élargir ton public mais je ne pense pas que de voir une photo soit la même chose que de rencontrer les mots eux-mêmes dans la rue.

Tu te vois toujours faire ça dans 5 ou 10 ans?

Je ne sais pas vraiment. Surement

Est-ce que tu fais de l’art sur d’autres mediums ?

Les autocollants n’ont jamais été le truc dominant. Je ne sors pas spécialement pour aller les coller. J’en prends juste quelques uns quand je sors. Je ne suis pas si prolifique. Je fais quelques peintures, un peu de musique à l’occasion. Mon collectif artistique organise quelques expos et concerts chaque année, comme the Mishap Prom ou d’autres trucs comme ça. J’essaie d’être productif. Maintenant j’ai un travail, j’enseigne l’art à des enfants, ce qui est assez fou.

Une bonne histoire à partager? Une réaction vis-à-vis des tes autocollants ?

Parfois les gens écrivent une réponse, ou répondent avec un autocollant. Quelqu’un a écrit d’un autocollant qu’il était asinien et vulgaire. Au moins ça lui a fait ressentir quelque chose. Une fois une fille (j’imagine) a écrit son numéro de téléphone avec un petit mot qui disait appelle moi ou un truc du genre. Je ne l’ai pas fait. Désolé !

Quelque chose à ajouter? Un message que tu veux transmettre?

Je crois que c’est tout.

Liens

Crapcore

Mishap

Gallery 1

Gallery 2

adam02

Comments 11 Comments »

[J’ai mis la traduction en francais a la suite. Neanmoins je recommande aux bilingues la VO, plus authentique.]

Here is a first interview. I hope I’ll do some more. My goal is to focus on people who make stickers and posters. I guess it’s not obvious for an artist to put words on his images, but the exercise can be interesting. Through these questions I’m trying to create the portrait of various artists who deserve to be known more.

We are starting with DAVe, prolific in the Bay Area and who has a pretty clear vision of his artwork. My questions are about his personality, his relationship with the public, his universe and his big projects.

Interview of DAVe / Questions by Koleo

Your name?
Dave Warnke.

Your Nickname?
DAVe.

For how long have you made stickers?
I’ve been making stickers since 1998. I started making street art in 1989.

Before focusing on your stickers I’d like to get a larger vision of your art. What are your other artistic mediums?
I paint on canvas, wood and cardboard and paper. I use acrylics, house paints and spray paints.

Which was your first?
My first artistic mediums were finger paints and crayons.

What place do you give to your stickers in your art?

My stickers are an important part of my art. The characters I create on my stickers end up in my paintings.

Did you start canvas as a more elaborate form of stickers or do you see them as a parallel activity?
Making stickers is more direct. I usually know what the sticker will look like before I draw it. Whereas with painting it’s more of an experimental process of discovery.

Did painting on the streets change your vision of your art?
Painting on walls and putting stickers and posters in the streets opened me up creatively. It gave me lots of confidence and provided me with many opportunities to share my art with the public.

If so, did it also cause you to paint differently?
My art got bolder and the colors got brighter.

I read that you studied art in schools so I’m pretty sure that you are able to do classic drawing. Do you think that your characters are “well done”? When artists started doing abstractions some people saw them as bad painters because it looked easy to do. Therefore do you think that by the simplicity of your lines one could see your work as badly done? How do you feel about that?
I think my characters are simple and silly. It’s not easy to be simple. You have less to work with. What people consider “good” or “bad” is a matter of taste. I don’t think classic drawing is better than simplicity or abstractions. In fact, I prefer simplicity or abstractions in art.

What is your goal when you exhibit your work in galleries, beyond having a career as an artist? To expand your audience? To gain a new medium?
Exhibiting my artwork in galleries is just another place to share what I do, like the streets. Unlike the streets, galleries are spaces deigned to show art with clean white walls and good lighting. Galleries provide people a chance to really look at art and buy it if they like it and can afford it. I think my painting look better in galleries and my stickers and posters look better in the streets.

Do you frequently collaborate with other artists (like your last show with Michael Wertz)? What do you learn from this kind of experience?
I mostly work be myself. But I love collaborating on projects with other artists. Collaborations push me to try new things with my art. Collaborations also offer support and company.

Are you looking for a contact/an exchange with the people when you work in the street?
Yes. I do lots of sticker trades. And when I put stuff in the streets I hope that people enjoy what they see.

What kind of reaction do people generally have?
People seem to enjoy the artwork I put in the streets. They smile or giggle.

Best memory/ worst memory?
Best memory: watching people look at my street art.
Worst memory: being chased by a security guard.

Do you have an ideal spectator?
No, I don’t have an ideal spectator. The art on the streets is intended for anyone and everyone. I hope the spectators smile or giggle.

To clarify the previous question, are you smiling to show how happy you are, or are you trying to make people smile?
I want my art to be funny and uplifting. It’s not about how happy I am. It’s more like comedy. I want to make people smile at my art.

Do you ever want to paint morbid things?
No. The world is morbid enough.

Are you also a spectator of street paintings? Are you only looking at stickers or are you also interested by graffiti?
I love looking at art of all styles. I especially look for and enjoy seeing stickers on the streets.

Sometimes I think that everyday people can have a hard time understanding tags and graffiti, especially because they can be difficult to read and the motivations of their authors stay mysterious. Your drawings are easier to understand, I mean that what you want to represent is often obvious even without knowing your artistic reflection. How do you see yourself in comparison with the graffiti scene in general?
I’ve never considered myself a graffiti writer, even when I was tagging for a short period of time. I consider myself a street artist. I make my art at home and put it up in the streets. I want my street art to be easily understood and enjoyed. I see myself as the ‘class clown’ of the local street art scene.

Do you make a difference between street art and graffiti? Do you agree with this kind of categorization?
Yes and no. Graffiti is when you paint directly on a wall or surface. Graffiti has particular styles, rules and history. Graffiti is a subculture of Street Art. Street Art is stickering, stenciling, postering etc. I think street art tends to be more experimental and free.

According to you, what is a good street artist? What do you like to see, what kind of things do you enjoy? Can you drop some names?
I admire and respect anyone who puts their art in the streets with the intention of enhancing the environment. I don’t respect people who only want to vandalize and destroy things. A good street artist in my opinion has his own style, picks good spots, and gets up a lot. There are too many names to drop.

What is the source of your creativity? I guess that your childhood is a big part of this. Is this a general feeling or are you inspired by precise references, like books, cartoons, comics?
I try to recapture the joy and vitality of my childhood artwork. My inspirations are Dr. Seuss books, MAD Magazine, Bugs Bunny, Tex Avery, Ub Iwerks and Max Fleisher cartoons, Keith Haring, Jean Dubuffet, Kenny Scharf, Jean Michel Basquiat, Shepard Fairey, Barry McGee, Chris Joahansen, Gary Basemen, Mumbleboy. And I know there are many more that I’m forgetting. I get inspiration

More generally, are you inspired by other form of art (architecture, music, cinema, literature, classic painting, etc)? Some names?
I get inspiration from all forms of art. My biggest inspirations are visual arts and music.

I know that you saw the documentary about Marla. A lot of interesting questions were underlined by this movie. I’d like to ask you one of them; is an adult innocent enough to pretend to draw like a kid?
I don’t think adults are innocent like children, but adults can be as playful as children. Children tend to be more in touch with their imaginations. For me it’s not about the innocence of children’s art but their freedom and fearlessness that I most admire. I don’t pretend to draw like a child. I draw and paint the way I feel and enjoy. It just happens to look childlike.

So are you innocent?
No

When you were a child, were you drawing like an adult?
No.

You organized a class called Street Style. Can you tell me more about this project? Do you want to keep on doing this kind of project in the future?
Street Styles is a free after school art program I created and taught for 3 years in San Francisco. Street Styles teaches youth the history, techniques and styles of street art and graffiti. The mission of Street Styles is to educate and inspire students to develop their own artistic style, to improve their visual art skills, and to contribute to their communities in positive ways.
The goals of Street Styles are to:
• Promote creativity through inspiration and instruction.
• Provide a safe, supportive and fun learning and working environment.
• Teach the history and cultural context of street art.
• Encourage devotion to work.
• Give youth the experience of making art.
• Develop student’s expressive and communication skills.
• Connect youth from different backgrounds and cultures to create and collaborate with other youth.
• Discuss and distinguish the difference between art and vandalism.
• Provide an opportunity for youth to show and sell their artwork.

The youth that attend Street Styles face many challenges and dangers outside of the program such as violence and gang activity in their neighborhoods, schools and at home, broken families, drugs and alcohol abuse, lack of jobs and economic opportunities, under funded and over crowed schools and lack of community resources. Many of the Street Styles students are graffiti writers, who engage in acts of vandalism. I want to provide a safe, supportive and legal outlet for youth who want to express themselves through this art form.

Yes, I hope to keep this program going in the future.

Super Furry 504( I and II), your new exhibit with Michael Wertz just started. Are you trying to make a living off your art? What are you hopes for the future as an artist? What would be your ideal goal?
I’ve been trying to make my living off my art for 9 years. Now that I have a wife and children, I’m teaching art to support me and my family. My hope is to keep creating and teaching art till I die. It’s a livelong love and commitment. My ideal goal would be to make art all day 5 days a week.

Do you have some words to say to end this interview?
Be creative. Work hard. Be nice. Have fun.

DAVe on Flickr
DAVe about Street Style
DAVe at Hang



Voici une première interview. J’espère en faire d’autres pour ce blog; toujours en essayant de m’intéresser aux créateurs d’autocollants et d’affiches. Ce n’est pas évident pour un artiste de parler de son travail, il s’exprime déjà par le pinceau ou le feutre. Le pousser a s’interroger sur sa personne de façon pertinente peut s’avérer être un exercice difficile. Pour ma part, je vais tenter de créer le portrait de quelques artistes en éclairant des points qui m’ont intrigué en voyant leurs œuvres. J’espère aussi trouver dans leurs réponses de la diversité et des contradictions car je tend à croire que les artistes d’aujourd’hui ont des motivations nombreuses et ouvertes au changement.

Je commence avec DAVe, prolifique dans la baie de San Francisco et qui a une vision assez claire sur son travail. Mes questions cherchent a explorer sa personnalite, son rapport aux spectateurs, son univers et ses projets futures.

Questions de Koleo, réponses de DAVe

Ton nom?
Dave Warnke.

Ta signature?
DAVe

Depuis quand fais tu des autocollants?
Je fais des autocollants depuis 1998. J’ai commencé à faire du street art en 1989.

Je m’interesse surtout à tes autocollants. Histoire de ne pas te decouper en morceau, quels sont les autres domaines artistiques par lesquels tu t’exprimes?
Je fais des peintures sur toile, bois, carton et papier. J’utilise de l’acrylique et des bombes.

Par quoi as tu commencé?
J’ai commencé à peindre en utilisant mes doigts et des pastels.

Quelle place accordes tu alors aux autocollants dans ton travail?
Mes autocollants représente une part importante de mon travail artistique. Les personnages que je crée pour mes autocollants se retrouvent dans mes peintures.

Est ce ce médium qui t’as amène à faire un travail sur toile, ou le vois tu comme quelque chose à part qui vit en parallèle?
Je fais mes autocollants de manière plus directe. Généralement je sais à quoi le sticker va ressembler avant même de l’avoir dessiné. Par contre, pour mes peintures le processus est plus expérimental, je fais des découvertes.

A travers tes activités de rue, ta curiosité a t elle été stimulée vers d’autres pratiques?
A force de peindre sur les murs, de coller des stickers et des affiches dans la rue j’ai stimulé ma créativité. Ça m’a donne plus de confiance et ça m’a nourrit en m’offrant la possibilité de partager mon art avec le public.

Plus clairement, est ce qu’à force de faire des autocollants tu as senti l’envie de peindre differement?
J’ai épuré mon trait et j’utilise des couleurs plus vives.

J’ai lu que tu avais fréquenté des écoles d’art et que tu étais même diplômé. J’imagine que tu dois savoir peindre et dessiner de manière classique. Penses tu que tes personnages sont “bien dessinés“? Et est ce que tu crois souffrir du même regard que l’on peut avoir sur l’art abstrait? a savoir que certains trouvent ça bâclé du fait que ce soit simple et épuré.
Je pense que mes personnages sont simples et rigolos. Ce n’est pas facile d’être simple. Tu as moins de matériau pour travailler. Ce que les gens considère comme “bien” ou “mauvais” est une question de gout. Je ne pense pas que le dessin classique soit meilleur que le minimalisme ou l’abstraction. En fait je préfère la simplicité et l’abstraction en art.

Qu’est ce que tu recherche en galerie, en plus d’une carrière artistique? Un nouveau public? Un médium complémentaire?
Montrer mon travail en galeries est juste une occasion supplémentaire de partager ce que je fais. Comme quand je m’expose dans la rue. La différence est que les galeries sont des espaces organises pour, avec de beaux murs blancs et un bon éclairage. Les galeries offrent aux gens la chance de vraiment regarder des œuvres d’art et de s’en acheter s’ils le peuvent. Je pense que mes peintures rendent mieux en galerie et que mes autocollants et mes affiches sont a leur place dans la rue.

T’arrive t il souvent de faire des collaborations? Qu’est ce que tu en retire?
La plupart du temps je travail seul. Mais j’adore collaborer sur certains projets avec d’autres artistes. Les collaborations me poussent a essayer de nouvelles choses. Elles apportent aussi une aide et de la compagnie.

Cherches tu le contact avec les gens lorsque tu intervient dans la rue?
Oui. D’ailleurs je donne souvent mes autocollants. Quand je pose quelque chose dans la rue j’espère que les gens vont l’apprécier.

Quel genre de reaction ont ils ?
Les gens ont l’air de bien aimer mon travail artistique. Ils rient et s’en amusent.

Ton meilleur souvenir? Le pire?

Le meilleur: voir des gens regarder mes oeuvres.
Le pire: me faire virer par un mec de la securite.

As tu un spectateur ideal?
Non, pas du tout. L’art de rue est destiné à tout le monde, n’importe qui. J’espère juste que les gens se marrent et apprécient.

Tes personages sont très souriants, ou du moins colorés et vif. Es tu tout simplement quelqu’un d’heureux de facon permanente ou es tu dans la demarche de rependre la gaiete sur ton passage?
Je veux que mon art soit amusant et rejouissant. Il n’est pas question de ma bonne humeur. C’est plus comme de la comédie. Je veux faire sourir les gens avec mes oeuvres.

Tu n’as jamais envie de faire des trucs morbides?
Non. Le monde l’est déjà suffisament.

Es tu spectateur de la scene artistique de rue. Ton regard est il attiré seulement par les domaines que tu pratiques ou as tu une vision plus large qui s’etend au graffiti?
J’adore l’art sous toutes ses formes. Je préfère tout particulièrement les stickers.

J’ai l’impression que Monsieur et Madame Tout-le-monde ont parfois du mal a comprendre les tags et les graffitis. Premièrement au niveau de leur lecture, puis des motivations qui poussent leur auteurs à en faire autant malgré les risques. Tes dessins sont plus facilement compréhensible, au sens ou on sais tout de suite ce que tu cherches à représenter; meme sans connaitre ta démarche artistique. Comment te positionnes tu par rapport a la scène disons plus graffiti?
Je ne me suis jamais considere comme un graffiti writer, meme le peu de temps ou j’ai fais des tags. Je me vois comme un street artist. Je produit mes oeuvres a la maison puis je les pose dans les rues. Je veux que mon street art soit accessible et apprecie. Je me vois un peu comme le class clown de la scène street art local.

Fais tu une distinction entre street art et graffiti? Adhères tu à ce genre d’etiquettes?
Oui et non. Le graffiti c’est quand tu peins directement sur un mur ou une surface. Le graffiti a des styles particuliers, des regles et une histoire. Le graffiti decoule du street art. Le street art c’est les autocollants, les pochoirs, les affiches, etc. Je pense que le street art tend à être plus libre et experimental.

C’est quoi pour toi un bon artiste de rue? Quel genre de choses aimes tu voir, qu’est ce qui te touche? Si tu as quelques noms a donner…
J’admire et respecte tout ceux qui font de l’art dans la rue avec l’intention de mettre en valeur leur environnement. Je ne respecte pas ceux qui veulent seulement vandaliser et detruire. Un bon artiste de rue, d’après moi, a son propre style, s’approprie des bons spots et avance. Ce serait trop long de tous les citer, il y en a tellement.

D’ou puises tu ta creativite? Ton enfance j’imagine. En gardes tu des souvenirs précis d’ou tu puise ton inspiration? Comme des livres, dessins animes, bande dessinees?
J’essaie de retrouver la joie et la vitalité de mes dessins d’enfance. Mes inspirations sont les livres du Dr. Seuss, MAD Magazine, Bugs Bunny, Tex Avery, les cartoons de Ub Iwerks et Max Fleisher, Keith Haring, Jean Dubuffet, Kenny Scharf, Jean Michel Basquiat, Shepard Fairey, Barry McGee, Chris Joahansen, Gary Basemen, Mumbleboy. Et je sais que j’en oublie plein.

Plus largement y a t il des domaines artistiques qui te nourissent (musique, cinema, literature, architecture, peinture…)?
Je suis inspiré par toutes les formes d’art. Mes plus grosses inspirations viennent des arts visuels et de la musique.

As tu vu le reportage sur Marla? Il souleve plusieurs questions. On y voit notament un adulte qui aide un enfant a canaliser sa creativite. Un adulte peut il etre suffisament innocent pour pretendre dessiner avec la vision d’un enfant?
Je ne pense pas que les adultes soient aussi innocent que les enfants, mais ils peuvent etre aussi joueurs. Les enfants tendent a etre plus en phase avec leur imagination. Pour moi ce n’est pas une question d’innocence. Ce que j’admire chez les enfant c’est leur liberte et leur intrépidité. Je ne pretend pas peindre comme eux, je peins de la facon qui me plait. Il se trouve que ca a l’air enfantin.

Te definirais tu comme innocent?
Non.

Et enfant, dessinais tu comme un adulte?
Non.

Je sais que tu as une exposition en ce moment (I et II). Cherche tu as vivre de ton art? Quels sont tes espoirs pour ton avenir artistique?
Ca fait 9 ans que j’essaie de vivre de ma peinture. Maintenant que j’ai une femme et une fille, je supporte ma famille en etant enseignant. J’espere rester creatif et enseigner l’art jusqu’a ma mort. C’est un amour et un engagement a vie. Mon but ultime serait de faire de l’art toute la journee, 5 jours par semaine.

Un dernier mot?
Soyez creative. Travaillez dur. Soyez sympa. Amusez vous.


DAVe sur Flickr
DAVe a propos de Street Style

DAVe chez Hang

Comments 12 Comments »

Rien de tel qu’un bon gros …

pet pourri

Comments 1 Comment »

Gros plan sur Adam Infanticide 2

Insolent, prétentieux, gratuit, méchant et drôle. Bref, tout sauf lisse. Ça fait du bien de croiser ces mystérieux autocollants signés d’un cœur. Certains font rire… un peu comme une blague raciste. Ça rappelle a quel point le politiquement correct est répandu. Voila une petite sélection de ce que j’ai pu voir depuis un mois entre Oakland et SF.

Focus on Adam Infanticide 2

Itchy, insolent, mean and fun. Not consensual one second. What is the mystery hidden behind this lovely little heart? I don’t know but they make me laugh, like certain racist jokes. This kind of apparition in the streets of Oakland and SF remind me how powerful is the politically correct here! Enjoy!

adam01 adam04

adam10 adam05

adam02 adam03

adam06
adam07

adam08

adam11 adam12

adam09

adam16 adam17

adam14 adam19

adam18 adam20

adam13 adam15

Comments 8 Comments »

Gros plan sur Badypnose

Enfin du local! Badypnose, un blase que je croise essentiellement dans le treizième. Un petit coté « attaque mentale » et un peu long qui peut faire penser à un Psyckoze No Limit. Je n’ai pas le vocabulaire technique pour parler de calligraphie. En tout cas son tag est bien propre, équilibré et énergique. Il ne joue pas sur la quantité pourtant le peu que j’ai vu m’a à chaque fois fait tilter. Discret et original, on sent un kiffe un peu perso, pas une recherche de visibilité absolue et c’est quelque chose qui devient rare! Je vous laisse apprécier cette petite sélection, une série d’autocollants qui se conclue par un mur.

badypnoze5

badypnoze4

badypnoze6

badypnoze1

badypnoze2

badypnoze3

Focus on Badypnose

Locals only! Badypnose, I see this name all around my neighborhood, in Paris’s Chinatown. It sounds like a mental attack. A pretty long name which can remind you Psyckose No Limit. I don’t have all the technical words to describe the calligraphic aspect of his stuff. The less I can say is that his name is always original, energetic, clean and well balanced. They are not so much of his stickers, he doesn’t seem to be looking for attention. It must be a personal trip. And I like it, it’s something pretty rare nowadays. So, enjoy this series of picture: some stickers and a wall to conclude.

Comments 7 Comments »

Home Contact About About Gallery Blogs Forum Wallpapers Links