Posts Tagged “dave”

[J’ai mis la traduction en francais a la suite. Neanmoins je recommande aux bilingues la VO, plus authentique.]

Here is a first interview. I hope I’ll do some more. My goal is to focus on people who make stickers and posters. I guess it’s not obvious for an artist to put words on his images, but the exercise can be interesting. Through these questions I’m trying to create the portrait of various artists who deserve to be known more.

We are starting with DAVe, prolific in the Bay Area and who has a pretty clear vision of his artwork. My questions are about his personality, his relationship with the public, his universe and his big projects.

Interview of DAVe / Questions by Koleo

Your name?
Dave Warnke.

Your Nickname?
DAVe.

For how long have you made stickers?
I’ve been making stickers since 1998. I started making street art in 1989.

Before focusing on your stickers I’d like to get a larger vision of your art. What are your other artistic mediums?
I paint on canvas, wood and cardboard and paper. I use acrylics, house paints and spray paints.

Which was your first?
My first artistic mediums were finger paints and crayons.

What place do you give to your stickers in your art?

My stickers are an important part of my art. The characters I create on my stickers end up in my paintings.

Did you start canvas as a more elaborate form of stickers or do you see them as a parallel activity?
Making stickers is more direct. I usually know what the sticker will look like before I draw it. Whereas with painting it’s more of an experimental process of discovery.

Did painting on the streets change your vision of your art?
Painting on walls and putting stickers and posters in the streets opened me up creatively. It gave me lots of confidence and provided me with many opportunities to share my art with the public.

If so, did it also cause you to paint differently?
My art got bolder and the colors got brighter.

I read that you studied art in schools so I’m pretty sure that you are able to do classic drawing. Do you think that your characters are “well done”? When artists started doing abstractions some people saw them as bad painters because it looked easy to do. Therefore do you think that by the simplicity of your lines one could see your work as badly done? How do you feel about that?
I think my characters are simple and silly. It’s not easy to be simple. You have less to work with. What people consider “good” or “bad” is a matter of taste. I don’t think classic drawing is better than simplicity or abstractions. In fact, I prefer simplicity or abstractions in art.

What is your goal when you exhibit your work in galleries, beyond having a career as an artist? To expand your audience? To gain a new medium?
Exhibiting my artwork in galleries is just another place to share what I do, like the streets. Unlike the streets, galleries are spaces deigned to show art with clean white walls and good lighting. Galleries provide people a chance to really look at art and buy it if they like it and can afford it. I think my painting look better in galleries and my stickers and posters look better in the streets.

Do you frequently collaborate with other artists (like your last show with Michael Wertz)? What do you learn from this kind of experience?
I mostly work be myself. But I love collaborating on projects with other artists. Collaborations push me to try new things with my art. Collaborations also offer support and company.

Are you looking for a contact/an exchange with the people when you work in the street?
Yes. I do lots of sticker trades. And when I put stuff in the streets I hope that people enjoy what they see.

What kind of reaction do people generally have?
People seem to enjoy the artwork I put in the streets. They smile or giggle.

Best memory/ worst memory?
Best memory: watching people look at my street art.
Worst memory: being chased by a security guard.

Do you have an ideal spectator?
No, I don’t have an ideal spectator. The art on the streets is intended for anyone and everyone. I hope the spectators smile or giggle.

To clarify the previous question, are you smiling to show how happy you are, or are you trying to make people smile?
I want my art to be funny and uplifting. It’s not about how happy I am. It’s more like comedy. I want to make people smile at my art.

Do you ever want to paint morbid things?
No. The world is morbid enough.

Are you also a spectator of street paintings? Are you only looking at stickers or are you also interested by graffiti?
I love looking at art of all styles. I especially look for and enjoy seeing stickers on the streets.

Sometimes I think that everyday people can have a hard time understanding tags and graffiti, especially because they can be difficult to read and the motivations of their authors stay mysterious. Your drawings are easier to understand, I mean that what you want to represent is often obvious even without knowing your artistic reflection. How do you see yourself in comparison with the graffiti scene in general?
I’ve never considered myself a graffiti writer, even when I was tagging for a short period of time. I consider myself a street artist. I make my art at home and put it up in the streets. I want my street art to be easily understood and enjoyed. I see myself as the ‘class clown’ of the local street art scene.

Do you make a difference between street art and graffiti? Do you agree with this kind of categorization?
Yes and no. Graffiti is when you paint directly on a wall or surface. Graffiti has particular styles, rules and history. Graffiti is a subculture of Street Art. Street Art is stickering, stenciling, postering etc. I think street art tends to be more experimental and free.

According to you, what is a good street artist? What do you like to see, what kind of things do you enjoy? Can you drop some names?
I admire and respect anyone who puts their art in the streets with the intention of enhancing the environment. I don’t respect people who only want to vandalize and destroy things. A good street artist in my opinion has his own style, picks good spots, and gets up a lot. There are too many names to drop.

What is the source of your creativity? I guess that your childhood is a big part of this. Is this a general feeling or are you inspired by precise references, like books, cartoons, comics?
I try to recapture the joy and vitality of my childhood artwork. My inspirations are Dr. Seuss books, MAD Magazine, Bugs Bunny, Tex Avery, Ub Iwerks and Max Fleisher cartoons, Keith Haring, Jean Dubuffet, Kenny Scharf, Jean Michel Basquiat, Shepard Fairey, Barry McGee, Chris Joahansen, Gary Basemen, Mumbleboy. And I know there are many more that I’m forgetting. I get inspiration

More generally, are you inspired by other form of art (architecture, music, cinema, literature, classic painting, etc)? Some names?
I get inspiration from all forms of art. My biggest inspirations are visual arts and music.

I know that you saw the documentary about Marla. A lot of interesting questions were underlined by this movie. I’d like to ask you one of them; is an adult innocent enough to pretend to draw like a kid?
I don’t think adults are innocent like children, but adults can be as playful as children. Children tend to be more in touch with their imaginations. For me it’s not about the innocence of children’s art but their freedom and fearlessness that I most admire. I don’t pretend to draw like a child. I draw and paint the way I feel and enjoy. It just happens to look childlike.

So are you innocent?
No

When you were a child, were you drawing like an adult?
No.

You organized a class called Street Style. Can you tell me more about this project? Do you want to keep on doing this kind of project in the future?
Street Styles is a free after school art program I created and taught for 3 years in San Francisco. Street Styles teaches youth the history, techniques and styles of street art and graffiti. The mission of Street Styles is to educate and inspire students to develop their own artistic style, to improve their visual art skills, and to contribute to their communities in positive ways.
The goals of Street Styles are to:
• Promote creativity through inspiration and instruction.
• Provide a safe, supportive and fun learning and working environment.
• Teach the history and cultural context of street art.
• Encourage devotion to work.
• Give youth the experience of making art.
• Develop student’s expressive and communication skills.
• Connect youth from different backgrounds and cultures to create and collaborate with other youth.
• Discuss and distinguish the difference between art and vandalism.
• Provide an opportunity for youth to show and sell their artwork.

The youth that attend Street Styles face many challenges and dangers outside of the program such as violence and gang activity in their neighborhoods, schools and at home, broken families, drugs and alcohol abuse, lack of jobs and economic opportunities, under funded and over crowed schools and lack of community resources. Many of the Street Styles students are graffiti writers, who engage in acts of vandalism. I want to provide a safe, supportive and legal outlet for youth who want to express themselves through this art form.

Yes, I hope to keep this program going in the future.

Super Furry 504( I and II), your new exhibit with Michael Wertz just started. Are you trying to make a living off your art? What are you hopes for the future as an artist? What would be your ideal goal?
I’ve been trying to make my living off my art for 9 years. Now that I have a wife and children, I’m teaching art to support me and my family. My hope is to keep creating and teaching art till I die. It’s a livelong love and commitment. My ideal goal would be to make art all day 5 days a week.

Do you have some words to say to end this interview?
Be creative. Work hard. Be nice. Have fun.

DAVe on Flickr
DAVe about Street Style
DAVe at Hang



Voici une première interview. J’espère en faire d’autres pour ce blog; toujours en essayant de m’intéresser aux créateurs d’autocollants et d’affiches. Ce n’est pas évident pour un artiste de parler de son travail, il s’exprime déjà par le pinceau ou le feutre. Le pousser a s’interroger sur sa personne de façon pertinente peut s’avérer être un exercice difficile. Pour ma part, je vais tenter de créer le portrait de quelques artistes en éclairant des points qui m’ont intrigué en voyant leurs œuvres. J’espère aussi trouver dans leurs réponses de la diversité et des contradictions car je tend à croire que les artistes d’aujourd’hui ont des motivations nombreuses et ouvertes au changement.

Je commence avec DAVe, prolifique dans la baie de San Francisco et qui a une vision assez claire sur son travail. Mes questions cherchent a explorer sa personnalite, son rapport aux spectateurs, son univers et ses projets futures.

Questions de Koleo, réponses de DAVe

Ton nom?
Dave Warnke.

Ta signature?
DAVe

Depuis quand fais tu des autocollants?
Je fais des autocollants depuis 1998. J’ai commencé à faire du street art en 1989.

Je m’interesse surtout à tes autocollants. Histoire de ne pas te decouper en morceau, quels sont les autres domaines artistiques par lesquels tu t’exprimes?
Je fais des peintures sur toile, bois, carton et papier. J’utilise de l’acrylique et des bombes.

Par quoi as tu commencé?
J’ai commencé à peindre en utilisant mes doigts et des pastels.

Quelle place accordes tu alors aux autocollants dans ton travail?
Mes autocollants représente une part importante de mon travail artistique. Les personnages que je crée pour mes autocollants se retrouvent dans mes peintures.

Est ce ce médium qui t’as amène à faire un travail sur toile, ou le vois tu comme quelque chose à part qui vit en parallèle?
Je fais mes autocollants de manière plus directe. Généralement je sais à quoi le sticker va ressembler avant même de l’avoir dessiné. Par contre, pour mes peintures le processus est plus expérimental, je fais des découvertes.

A travers tes activités de rue, ta curiosité a t elle été stimulée vers d’autres pratiques?
A force de peindre sur les murs, de coller des stickers et des affiches dans la rue j’ai stimulé ma créativité. Ça m’a donne plus de confiance et ça m’a nourrit en m’offrant la possibilité de partager mon art avec le public.

Plus clairement, est ce qu’à force de faire des autocollants tu as senti l’envie de peindre differement?
J’ai épuré mon trait et j’utilise des couleurs plus vives.

J’ai lu que tu avais fréquenté des écoles d’art et que tu étais même diplômé. J’imagine que tu dois savoir peindre et dessiner de manière classique. Penses tu que tes personnages sont “bien dessinés“? Et est ce que tu crois souffrir du même regard que l’on peut avoir sur l’art abstrait? a savoir que certains trouvent ça bâclé du fait que ce soit simple et épuré.
Je pense que mes personnages sont simples et rigolos. Ce n’est pas facile d’être simple. Tu as moins de matériau pour travailler. Ce que les gens considère comme “bien” ou “mauvais” est une question de gout. Je ne pense pas que le dessin classique soit meilleur que le minimalisme ou l’abstraction. En fait je préfère la simplicité et l’abstraction en art.

Qu’est ce que tu recherche en galerie, en plus d’une carrière artistique? Un nouveau public? Un médium complémentaire?
Montrer mon travail en galeries est juste une occasion supplémentaire de partager ce que je fais. Comme quand je m’expose dans la rue. La différence est que les galeries sont des espaces organises pour, avec de beaux murs blancs et un bon éclairage. Les galeries offrent aux gens la chance de vraiment regarder des œuvres d’art et de s’en acheter s’ils le peuvent. Je pense que mes peintures rendent mieux en galerie et que mes autocollants et mes affiches sont a leur place dans la rue.

T’arrive t il souvent de faire des collaborations? Qu’est ce que tu en retire?
La plupart du temps je travail seul. Mais j’adore collaborer sur certains projets avec d’autres artistes. Les collaborations me poussent a essayer de nouvelles choses. Elles apportent aussi une aide et de la compagnie.

Cherches tu le contact avec les gens lorsque tu intervient dans la rue?
Oui. D’ailleurs je donne souvent mes autocollants. Quand je pose quelque chose dans la rue j’espère que les gens vont l’apprécier.

Quel genre de reaction ont ils ?
Les gens ont l’air de bien aimer mon travail artistique. Ils rient et s’en amusent.

Ton meilleur souvenir? Le pire?

Le meilleur: voir des gens regarder mes oeuvres.
Le pire: me faire virer par un mec de la securite.

As tu un spectateur ideal?
Non, pas du tout. L’art de rue est destiné à tout le monde, n’importe qui. J’espère juste que les gens se marrent et apprécient.

Tes personages sont très souriants, ou du moins colorés et vif. Es tu tout simplement quelqu’un d’heureux de facon permanente ou es tu dans la demarche de rependre la gaiete sur ton passage?
Je veux que mon art soit amusant et rejouissant. Il n’est pas question de ma bonne humeur. C’est plus comme de la comédie. Je veux faire sourir les gens avec mes oeuvres.

Tu n’as jamais envie de faire des trucs morbides?
Non. Le monde l’est déjà suffisament.

Es tu spectateur de la scene artistique de rue. Ton regard est il attiré seulement par les domaines que tu pratiques ou as tu une vision plus large qui s’etend au graffiti?
J’adore l’art sous toutes ses formes. Je préfère tout particulièrement les stickers.

J’ai l’impression que Monsieur et Madame Tout-le-monde ont parfois du mal a comprendre les tags et les graffitis. Premièrement au niveau de leur lecture, puis des motivations qui poussent leur auteurs à en faire autant malgré les risques. Tes dessins sont plus facilement compréhensible, au sens ou on sais tout de suite ce que tu cherches à représenter; meme sans connaitre ta démarche artistique. Comment te positionnes tu par rapport a la scène disons plus graffiti?
Je ne me suis jamais considere comme un graffiti writer, meme le peu de temps ou j’ai fais des tags. Je me vois comme un street artist. Je produit mes oeuvres a la maison puis je les pose dans les rues. Je veux que mon street art soit accessible et apprecie. Je me vois un peu comme le class clown de la scène street art local.

Fais tu une distinction entre street art et graffiti? Adhères tu à ce genre d’etiquettes?
Oui et non. Le graffiti c’est quand tu peins directement sur un mur ou une surface. Le graffiti a des styles particuliers, des regles et une histoire. Le graffiti decoule du street art. Le street art c’est les autocollants, les pochoirs, les affiches, etc. Je pense que le street art tend à être plus libre et experimental.

C’est quoi pour toi un bon artiste de rue? Quel genre de choses aimes tu voir, qu’est ce qui te touche? Si tu as quelques noms a donner…
J’admire et respecte tout ceux qui font de l’art dans la rue avec l’intention de mettre en valeur leur environnement. Je ne respecte pas ceux qui veulent seulement vandaliser et detruire. Un bon artiste de rue, d’après moi, a son propre style, s’approprie des bons spots et avance. Ce serait trop long de tous les citer, il y en a tellement.

D’ou puises tu ta creativite? Ton enfance j’imagine. En gardes tu des souvenirs précis d’ou tu puise ton inspiration? Comme des livres, dessins animes, bande dessinees?
J’essaie de retrouver la joie et la vitalité de mes dessins d’enfance. Mes inspirations sont les livres du Dr. Seuss, MAD Magazine, Bugs Bunny, Tex Avery, les cartoons de Ub Iwerks et Max Fleisher, Keith Haring, Jean Dubuffet, Kenny Scharf, Jean Michel Basquiat, Shepard Fairey, Barry McGee, Chris Joahansen, Gary Basemen, Mumbleboy. Et je sais que j’en oublie plein.

Plus largement y a t il des domaines artistiques qui te nourissent (musique, cinema, literature, architecture, peinture…)?
Je suis inspiré par toutes les formes d’art. Mes plus grosses inspirations viennent des arts visuels et de la musique.

As tu vu le reportage sur Marla? Il souleve plusieurs questions. On y voit notament un adulte qui aide un enfant a canaliser sa creativite. Un adulte peut il etre suffisament innocent pour pretendre dessiner avec la vision d’un enfant?
Je ne pense pas que les adultes soient aussi innocent que les enfants, mais ils peuvent etre aussi joueurs. Les enfants tendent a etre plus en phase avec leur imagination. Pour moi ce n’est pas une question d’innocence. Ce que j’admire chez les enfant c’est leur liberte et leur intrépidité. Je ne pretend pas peindre comme eux, je peins de la facon qui me plait. Il se trouve que ca a l’air enfantin.

Te definirais tu comme innocent?
Non.

Et enfant, dessinais tu comme un adulte?
Non.

Je sais que tu as une exposition en ce moment (I et II). Cherche tu as vivre de ton art? Quels sont tes espoirs pour ton avenir artistique?
Ca fait 9 ans que j’essaie de vivre de ma peinture. Maintenant que j’ai une femme et une fille, je supporte ma famille en etant enseignant. J’espere rester creatif et enseigner l’art jusqu’a ma mort. C’est un amour et un engagement a vie. Mon but ultime serait de faire de l’art toute la journee, 5 jours par semaine.

Un dernier mot?
Soyez creative. Travaillez dur. Soyez sympa. Amusez vous.


DAVe sur Flickr
DAVe a propos de Street Style

DAVe chez Hang

Comments 12 Comments »

Just some pictures of the show !

furry1

furry2

furry3

furry4

furry5

furry6

furry7

That’s all folks!

Comments 2 Comments »

furry00

Super Furry 504
Please join Dave Warnke and Michael Wertz for a super fun art show. Paintings, prints, live music, tasty snacks and adult beverages.
The date: Friday, March 6th
Start time: 7pm
The place: Cafe 504, 504 Wesley Ave, Oakland, California

Yesterday, meet up with Dave and Michael at the Cafe 504 while they  were preparing a mural for their new show: Super Furry 504. Fun discussion between some beers, the taste of a cookie in the mouth and the smell of spray cans all around.
I took some pictures as a teaser, unfortunately most of them are blurry, these are the less bad. More information about Dave pretty soon. If you are around Oakland on Friday, this show is definitively to add to the art murmur.

furry01

furry02

furry03

Comments 6 Comments »

Home Contact About About Gallery Blogs Forum Wallpapers Links